Media Arts Program
 

Saturday, December 1 at 8:00 p.m.

$8 general, $6 students/seniors, $5 members

To learn more about the benefits of becoming a member, please click here.

The Rest I Make Up


Irene with Michelle Memran (photo by Michael Smith).
Middle photo courtesy of Chris Bennion ©1987

(Michelle Memran, 2018, 79 minutes)

Director Michelle Memran presents, in person, her new documentary film about playwright María Irene Fornés

"Every time I listen to Fornés, or read or see one of her plays, I feel this: she breathes, has always breathed, a finer, purer, sharper air."

~ Tony Kushner


María Irene Fornés (May 14, 1930–October 30, 2018) has been called the greatest and least known dramatist of our time. She's written over 40 plays, won nine OBIE awards, and mentored thousands of playwrights across the globe. Off-Broadway's Signature Theatre devoted its entire 1999–2000 season to her work, and her epic What of the Night? was a finalist for the 1990 Pulitzer Prize. Theater luminaries like Tony Kushner, Caryl Churchill, Paula Vogel, Lanford Wilson, and Edward Albee have credited Irene as an inspiration and influence. "Her work has no precedents; it isn't derived from anything," Lanford Wilson once said of Irene. "She's the most original of us all." Paula Vogel contends: "In the work of every American playwright at the end of the 20th century, there are only two stages: before she has read María Irene Fornés—and after."

But Fornés did not set out to become a playwright. After arriving in New York City from Cuba in 1945, she worked mostly in textiles and even traveled as a painter to Paris in the 1950s ... continue reading >>

 
TOP

Thursday, January 24, 2019 at 7:00 p.m.

$8 general, $6 students/seniors, $5 members

To learn more about the benefits of becoming a member, please click here.

Garry Winogrand: All Things Are Photographable

directed by Sasha Waters Freyer

Described as a "poet," an "athlete," or a "philosopher" of photography, Garry Winogrand harnessed the serendipity of the streets to capture the American 1960s and '70s. His Leica M4 snapped spontaneous images of everyday people, from the Mad Men era of New York to the early years of the Women's Movement to post-Golden Age Hollywood, all while observing themes of cultural upheaval, political disillusionment, intimacy and alienation. Once derided by the critics, Winogrand's "snapshot aesthetic" is now the universal language of contemporary image making. Garry Winogrand: All Things are Photographable is the first cinematic treatment of Winogrand's work, including selections from the thousands of rolls of film still undeveloped upon his unexpected death in 1984. Interviews with Tod Papageorge, Matthew Weiner and more attest to Winogrand's indisputable influence, both as artist and chronicler of culture, while archived conversations with Jay Maisel highlight the gruff, streetwise perspective of "a city hick from the Bronx." In the tradition of Robert Frank and Henri Cartier-Bresson, Winogrand's candid, psychological style transports us to a bygone world, one where image lacked the editing and control possible today.

"This is a film primarily about photography, one that explores Garry Winogrand's tremendous contributions to the art form and his lasting influence on how we think of the medium today. But it is also a film that, I hope, explores and explodes the cliché of the undomesticated, self-destructive genius—one who is fundamentally unsuited to family life ... continue reading >>