Media Arts Program
 

Thursday, September 20, 2007

Raw Tactics Of The Subversive Body

Presented at:
Hallwalls

With co-curator by Andres Tapia-Urzua in person
Raw Tactics Of The Subversive Body is a video show featuring the work of twenty national and international video makers working with the human body as a form of individual expression—political, artistic and extreme. The idea for this program came up while observing the recent proliferation of the use of the human body as a political tactic—among others—in the form of suicide bombers, martyrs of the environment, human shields, human-cyber transformers, organic searchers of the body & soul connection, self expressive markers of the flesh, sexual self-awareness, etc.

Curators Andres Tapia-Urzua (Plan Z Media) and Alberto Roblest (Torre Visual) collaborated in the production of this show as they were both interested in the political and artistic uses of the body; its representation through the mass-media; and its artistic explorations through video and film—perhaps as a symbol of one of the ultimate subjective realities against organized systems of power. Themes include: the body as a weapon, the body as a symbol of resistance, the body vs. the machine, the organic body vs. the technological body, the spiritual quest of the material body, the martyr body, the pleasure body, the sacrificial body, the illegal body, the artistic body, the modified body, the medical body, the perverted body, the marked body, the erotic body, the diseased body, the desperate body vs. bureaucracy, the informational body, the body kamikaze, the sacrificial body, etc.

Participants (in order of appearance):
John Allen Gibel, Colette Copeland, Andrew Johnson, H. Michael Sanders, Andres Tapia-Urzua, Marco Casado, Terry Mohre, Ian Wallace, Luis Ramirez Guzman, Brenda Moreno Torres, SubRosa, Sarah Minter, Sal Ricalde, Jeff Silva, Mary Magsamen & Stephan Hillerbrand, Eva Drangsholt, Caroline Koebel, Federico Peretti, Alberto Roblest and Carolina Loyola-Garcia.

Screening curated by Alberto Roblest and Andres Tapia Urzua featuring media art by: John Allen Gibel (PLERMEDITHATU, 2:53min), Colette Copeland (WORM BELLY, 3min), Andrew Johnson (THE ANNUNCIATION II, 2:35min), H. Michael Sanders (NUDE DESCENDING A STAIRCASE, 6:30min), Andres Tapia-Urzua (MISSION A (JET) 2:30min), Marco Casado (SHE DREAMT, 5:22min), Terry Mohre (ZULU STOMP, 2 min), Ian Wallace (ABSOLUTION, 3:30min), Luis Ramirez Guzman (SIN TITULO UNO, 8min), Brenda Moreno Torres (SEPTICEMIA, 4:03min), SubRosa (VULVA DE/RE CONSTRUCTA, 9:19min), Sarah Minter (MEDIATION, 2:25min), Sal Ricalde (ZOONICO-SELCECTION, 1:35min), Jeff Silva (LUCHA LIBRE, 8:29min), Mary Magsamen and Stephan Hillerbrand (CHEESE PUFF, 2min), Eva Drangsholt (EXERCISE #3, 3:10min), Caroline Koebel (REACTION, 3:20min), Federico Peretti (SEPTIMO PISO-7th FLOOR, 6:40min), Alberto Roblest and Carolina Loyola-Garcia (NEEDS, 4:45min), with artists John Allen Gibel and Caroline Koebel, in person.


Some publications related to this event:
September, 2007 - 2007

 
 
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