Media Arts Program
 


Thursday, June 21 at 7:00 p.m.

$8 general, $6 students/seniors, $5 members

To learn more about the benefits of becoming a member, please click here.

Cultivate Cinema Circle and Hallwalls present

Irma Vep

Cold Water stillIrma Vep poster
1996, 99 minutes
French and English with English subtitles

Directed by: Olivier Assayas

Synopsis courtesy of San Francisco International Film Festival:

Luminous Hong Kong star Maggie Cheung (as herself) is summoned to Paris by director René Vidal (Jean-Pierre Léaud) to play the lead in an insane undertaking—a silent remake of Louis Feuillade's 1916 serial Les vampires. And she's constantly left behind rather than catered to amidst the chaos of warring personalities on the set: the witchy production coordinator (Dominique Faysse), a loud-mouthed TV reporter (Antoine Basler) with an anti-art film bias and the mysteriously and aggressively intrusive Mireille (Bulle Ogier), among others, all of whom flit across the screen like phantoms. Olivier Assayas's dizzying, poetic and exhilarating microcosm of modern life was written, shot, edited and mixed in record time (five months), and the sense of breathless speed fueled the finished product. Assayas put his constraints to work for him to create a film that is absolutely up-to-the-minute and liberating, a direct, free-form address to its audience. At the center of it all is the human ballast that keeps Irma Vep on course: the confused but tender relationship between Maggie and Zoë (Nathalie Richard, in the film's standout performance). Irma Vep is very funny, although the laughs tend to catch in your throat because this is no cozy love letter to filmmaking, like Day for Night of Living in Oblivion, as the film's final tortured, mindbending images demonstrate.

Written by Kent Jones

 
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Sunday, June 24 at 4:00 p.m.

FREE

The Latin American Solidarity Committee (LASC) of the WNY Peace Center & Interreligious Foundation for Community Organization (IFCO) present

Dare to Dream: Cuba's Latin American Medical School

(Jennifer Wager, 2017, 30 min.)

Cheryl LaBash, long time Cuba activist and co-chair of the National Network on Cuba, will be present to lead a discussion on ELAM and the Pastors for Peace 2018 Friendship Caravan

Cuba's Latin American Medical School is the largest medical school in the world, training nearly 30,000 doctors since 1999. ELAM as it is known in Spanish (Escuela Latinoamericana de Medicina) also trains doctors from the United States.* Follow the amazing adventure of American doctors trained in Cuba as they return home to the US to serve communities struggling with a health crisis in this inspirational film.

*ELAM is "fully accredited by the Medical Board of California, which has the strictest US standards—which means that qualified US graduates of the Latin American School of Medicine are eligible to apply for residency placements in any state of the US … The ELAM offer to US students [is] classified as a 'cultural exchange' program by the US State Department to avoid the restrictions of the U.S. embargo against Cuba … In 2004, the legality of the presence of US students at ELAM was threatened by tightened restrictions against travel to Cuba by US nationals under the administration of George W. Bush ... continue reading >>

 
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Thursday, July 19 at 7:00 p.m.

$8 general, $6 students/seniors, $5 members

To learn more about the benefits of becoming a member, please click here.

Cultivate Cinema Circle and Hallwalls present

Women Direct: Sofia Coppola's The Virgin Suicides

Introduction by Nichols High School's Classic Movie Night curator Andrea Mancuso

Women Direct: First Films By Modern Visionary Filmmakers

According to the Motion Picture Association of America's most recent reports, women account for 52% of moviegoers, though the San Diego State's Center for the Study of Women in Television and Film reported that of the top 100 grossing films of 2016, women represented: 4% of directors, 11% of writers, 3% of cinematographers, 19% of producers, and 14% of editors. Obviously, the movie industry has a gender disparity problem.

In an attempt to help right this unfathomable wrong, over the past two years we'vehosted over 60 screenings at various venues around Buffalo, all the while continuously highlighting the immensely important, formally inventive work of female filmmakers, including organizing a five film retrospective of work by Agnès Varda (who just recently received an honorary Oscar), hosting Jessica Oreck at Squeaky Wheel, screening Oscar shortlisted films by Nanfu Wang and Bonni Cohen, and showing important new work by Kirsten Johnson, Petra Costa, and Jenni Olson.

With the coming year, we've decided to go further with Women Direct: First Films By Modern Visionary Filmmakers, a year long series celebrating the first films of modern masters like Kelly Reichardt, Lucrecia Martel, Sofia Coppola, and Julie Dash, as well as important new voices in cinema such as Dee Rees, Desiree Akhavan, and Anna Rose Holmer, each of whom emerged with fully formed, wholly unique perspectives from the start of their careers and have helped shape the world of cinema as we know it today ...
continue reading >>

 
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Thursday, September 20 at 7:00 p.m.

$8 general, $6 students/seniors, $5 members

To learn more about the benefits of becoming a member, please click here.

Cultivate Cinema Circle and Hallwalls present

Women Direct: Desiree Akhavan's Appropriate Behavior

Introduction by Peach Mag visual arts curator Caitlin Coder

Women Direct: First Films By Modern Visionary Filmmakers

According to the Motion Picture Association of America's most recent reports, women account for 52% of moviegoers, though the San Diego State's Center for the Study of Women in Television and Film reported that of the top 100 grossing films of 2016, women represented: 4% of directors, 11% of writers, 3% of cinematographers, 19% of producers, and 14% of editors. Obviously, the movie industry has a gender disparity problem.

In an attempt to help right this unfathomable wrong, over the past two years we'vehosted over 60 screenings at various venues around Buffalo, all the while continuously highlighting the immensely important, formally inventive work of female filmmakers, including organizing a five film retrospective of work by Agnès Varda (who just recently received an honorary Oscar), hosting Jessica Oreck at Squeaky Wheel, screening Oscar shortlisted films by Nanfu Wang and Bonni Cohen, and showing important new work by Kirsten Johnson, Petra Costa, and Jenni Olson.

With the coming year, we've decided to go further with Women Direct: First Films By Modern Visionary Filmmakers, a year long series celebrating the first films of modern masters like Kelly Reichardt, Lucrecia Martel, Sofia Coppola, and Julie Dash, as well as important new voices in cinema such as Dee Rees, Desiree Akhavan, and Anna Rose Holmer, each of whom emerged with fully formed, wholly unique perspectives from the start of their careers and have helped shape the world of cinema as we know it today ...
continue reading >>

 
TOP


Thursday, November 8 at 7:00 p.m.

$8 general, $6 students/seniors, $5 members

To learn more about the benefits of becoming a member, please click here.

Cultivate Cinema Circle and Hallwalls present

Women Direct: Julie Dash's Daughters of the Dust

Introduction by artist / poet Annette Daniels Taylor

Women Direct: First Films By Modern Visionary Filmmakers

According to the Motion Picture Association of America's most recent reports, women account for 52% of moviegoers, though the San Diego State's Center for the Study of Women in Television and Film reported that of the top 100 grossing films of 2016, women represented: 4% of directors, 11% of writers, 3% of cinematographers, 19% of producers, and 14% of editors. Obviously, the movie industry has a gender disparity problem.

In an attempt to help right this unfathomable wrong, over the past two years we'vehosted over 60 screenings at various venues around Buffalo, all the while continuously highlighting the immensely important, formally inventive work of female filmmakers, including organizing a five film retrospective of work by Agnès Varda (who just recently received an honorary Oscar), hosting Jessica Oreck at Squeaky Wheel, screening Oscar shortlisted films by Nanfu Wang and Bonni Cohen, and showing important new work by Kirsten Johnson, Petra Costa, and Jenni Olson.

With the coming year, we've decided to go further with Women Direct: First Films By Modern Visionary Filmmakers, a year long series celebrating the first films of modern masters like Kelly Reichardt, Lucrecia Martel, Sofia Coppola, and Julie Dash, as well as important new voices in cinema such as Dee Rees, Desiree Akhavan, and Anna Rose Holmer, each of whom emerged with fully formed, wholly unique perspectives from the start of their careers and have helped shape the world of cinema as we know it today ...
continue reading >>