Literature Program
 


Wednesday, November 1 at 12:00 p.m. - 12:00 a.m.

Technē Institute for Art and Emerging Technologies and Hallwalls present

Finnegans Waves

The 9th Ward at Babeville (open to the public) & Hallwalls cinema (closed performance)

"If we can find the rhythm and make sure that Finnegans Wake is not unreadable, we can enter in the river of life—the riverrun—and let ourselves be carried by the deepest stream of consciousness."

~ Christian Giriat

Finnegans Waves is an artistic and social experiment in reading James Joyce's Finnegans Wake out loud. This event is organized by UB's Technē Institute for Art and Emerging Technologies.

The event will feature two parts, where the audience can choose to be a reader, a listener, or both. On one side, it is a participative event with a reading machine, based on a community of readers. Finnegans Wake will be read in twelve uninterrupted hours in the original text and in a variety of available translations, including French, German, Italian, Spanish, and Chinese, among others. The reading will take place under the supervision of the French stage director Christian Giriat.

Simultaneously, there will be a Recirculation Café in The Ninth Ward at Babeville, open to the public for the duration of the readings, where performances, music, and conferences will be offered (details forthcoming).

Please Note: while the 12-hour reading will be performed in Hallwalls' cinema space, it will not be open for a live audience and will only be viewable in the Recirculation Café in The Ninth Ward and streaming online.

Beginning at 7pm in the evening, while the readings continue and are broadcast in The Ninth Ward, a Joyce-themed Science & Art Cabaret will take place, after which the broadcasted readings will continue.

Light refreshments will be served.

Based in Avignon and Lyon, Christian Giriat is artist and director. He is one of the founding members of the Théâtre Mobile, France ... continue reading >>

 
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Friday, November 3 at 4:00 p.m.

FREE

UB Humanities Institute & Hallwalls present

Nicholas Lustig

Scholars @ Hallwalls

These monthly presentations feature one fellow's research in an engaging lecture with lively follow-up conversation. This year's lineup highlights the interdisciplinary range of humanities research at UB.

Talks are on Friday afternoons at 4 pm and are free and open to the public. Complimentary wine and hors d'oeuvres are served.

"The Variegated Spread of Real-Time Crime Centers"

Nicholas Lustig (Assistant Professor, Geography)

Professor Lustig examines the origins of the recently constructed mass-surveillance centers in urban police departments. These centers are multimillion-dollar intelligence hubs intended to overhaul information infrastructures and expand surveillance capabilities. Lustig's talk discusses the early programs in New York City and Baltimore, analyzes the varied pathways of diffusion of these centers, examines the most frequent criticisms of them (including privacy violations, targeting political activists, and mission creep), narrates a successful opposition to one in Oakland, and offers speculations about the future of these surveillance programs.

 
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Monday, November 6 at 7:00 p.m.

FREE

UB English Dept. & Hallwalls present

Evie Meidav

Exhibit X Fiction: Evie Meidav

Called "an American original," Edie Meidav is the author of Kingdom of the Young, a collection of fiction with a nonfiction coda; Lola, California, a novel concerning the death penalty, motherhood, female friendship, and the cultural aftermath of 1960s idealism; Crawl Space, a novel written in the voice of a Vichy criminal reckoning with the commodification of wartime memory; and The Far Field: A Novel of Ceylon, set in Sri Lanka and concerning the effects of the Western gaze on the East. Meidav's fiction, poetry, and criticism have appeared in many magazines and journals including Lithub, The Millions, Village Voice, Conjunctions, The American Voice, Ms., Kenyon Review, and Chattahoochee Review. In addition to winning a Howard Fellowship, a Lannan Literary Fellowship, the Bard Fiction Prize, and the Janet Heidinger Kafka Prize for best novel by an American woman, she has won Fulbright Awards in Sri Lanka and Cyprus. She is a senior editor at Conjunctions and teaches in the UMass Amherst MFA program.

 
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Friday, December 1 at 4:00 p.m.

FREE

UB Humanities Institute & Hallwalls present

Katja Praznik

Scholars @ Hallwalls

These monthly presentations feature one fellow's research in an engaging lecture with lively follow-up conversation. This year's lineup highlights the interdisciplinary range of humanities research at UB.

Talks are on Friday afternoons at 4 pm and are free and open to the public. Complimentary wine and hors d'oeuvres are served.

"The Paradox of Unpaid Labor in the US: Radical Creativity vs. Social Security"

Katja Praznik (Assistant Professor, Arts Management)

Professor Praznik will discuss the variegated forms of the paradox of unpaid artistic labor, which she defines as the contradiction between the prestige and perceived exceptionality of artistic work and the injustice of the precarious, often unpaid labor that sustains it. She examines specific historical regulation of artistic work in the United States and compares its consequent deconstruction after the WWII with the transformations of artistic labor in socialist contexts to demonstrate the undermining effects of neoliberalism on artistic labor and the rising resistance of art workers against these forces.

 
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Friday, February 9, 2018 at 4:00 p.m.

FREE

UB Humanities Institute & Hallwalls present

Richard Cohen

Scholars @ Hallwalls

These monthly presentations feature one fellow's research in an engaging lecture with lively follow-up conversation. This year's lineup highlights the interdisciplinary range of humanities research at UB.

Talks are on Friday afternoons at 4 pm and are free and open to the public. Complimentary wine and hors d'oeuvres are served.

"Capitalism, Globalization and Fascism"

Richard Cohen (Professor, Jewish Thought)

Capitalism is not merely an economic system but represents also a devaluation of all values, with money, a means, serving as the only "value." As such capitalism destroys all alternative value, undermining the dignity and solidarity of persons. In view of such capitalist nihilism, fascism promises to restore lost values, but in fact serves only as a violent cover for the ruling class of billionaires and multi-millionaires. The fascist regimes of early and mid-twentieth century in Italy, Germany and Spain, as well as more recent neo-fascist movements will be considered.

 
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Friday, March 2, 2018 at 4:00 p.m.

FREE

UB Humanities Institute & Hallwalls present

James Beebe

Scholars @ Hallwalls

These monthly presentations feature one fellow's research in an engaging lecture with lively follow-up conversation. This year's lineup highlights the interdisciplinary range of humanities research at UB.

Talks are on Friday afternoons at 4 pm and are free and open to the public. Complimentary wine and hors d'oeuvres are served.

"Healthy Skepticism vs. Denialism: How to Tell the Difference"

James Beebe (Professor, Philosophy)

Philosophy professor James Beebe will draw upon insights from skeptical traditions in both the ancient and the modern worlds in an effort to understand what distinguishes healthy, constructive doubt from crude denialism. He will consider the role that humanistic disciplines can play in helping citizens in a post-truth political climate to recognize and communicate sources of reliable and unreliable testimony, legitimate and illegitimate reasons for doubt, and how to balance often conflicting expert advice.

 
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Friday, March 23, 2018 at 8:00 p.m.

Just Buffalo Literary Center

Viet Thanh Nguyen

BABEL

Kleinhans Music Hall

Buy BABEL Season Tickets

photo courtesy of The Tuesday Agency
In the spring, we will continue to think about how Buffalo is the city of good neighbors when we welcome Pulitzer Prize winner Viet Thanh Nguyen.

Born in Viet Nam, Nguyen came to the United States as a refugee at the age of four. The feeling of being an outsider or "other" defines Nguyen's writing. Last year, his novel The Sympathizer topped more than 30 book-of-the-year lists.

In honor of Buffalo's proud record of welcoming more than 2,000 refugees this year alone from around the globe and ranking 8th in the country for the number of Syrian families who have resettled here in our community, we will read Nguyen's latest book, The Refugees. This beautiful collection of short stories explores universal and urgent themes of love and family, the histories we hold within us and the people "we can't afford to forget."

 
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Friday, April 13, 2018 at 4:00 p.m.

FREE

UB Humanities Institute & Hallwalls present

Amy Graves Monroe

Scholars @ Hallwalls

These monthly presentations feature one fellow's research in an engaging lecture with lively follow-up conversation. This year's lineup highlights the interdisciplinary range of humanities research at UB.

Talks are on Friday afternoons at 4 pm and are free and open to the public. Complimentary wine and hors d'oeuvres are served.

"Ex machina: The Tragedy in the Machine"

Amy Graves Monroe (Associate Professor, Romance Languages & Literatures)

Professor Monroe's talk argues for a deep connection between the rise of Pascalian probability, the interest in automata, the use of theater machines, and Aristotelian ideas of dramatic verisimilitude (i.e., likelihood) and catastrophe. As an interpretation of Aristotle, the Classical unities of time, place and action seek to formalize the circumstances of a happening on the stage. Drama becomes a forum for performing cause and effect, probing probability, exploring plausible outcomes, and wondering about the nature fate, chance, and necessity. The early modern play is a meditation on what constitutes an event.

 
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Friday, April 20, 2018 at 8:00 p.m.

Just Buffalo Literary Center

Junot Díaz

BABEL

Kleinhans Music Hall

Buy BABEL Season Tickets

photo © Nina Subin
We close out the 11th season of BABEL with MacArthur "genius" Junot Díaz.

Born in the Dominican Republic, Díaz immigrated to New Jersey when he was 6 years old. As a non-native speaker, Díaz mastered the English language as a young boy by reading—walking four miles, each way, to his public library to immerse himself in the world of books. Now a Professor of Writing at MIT, his novel The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao earned him a Pulitzer Prize, National Book Critics Circle Award, and was named TIME Magazine's Best Book of the Year. More recently, critics named this bittersweet and laugh-out-loud funny portrait of a multigenerational family with its "mash-up of Dominican history, comics, sci-fi, [and] magic realism" "the best novel of the 21st century to date."

 
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Friday, May 4, 2018 at 4:00 p.m.

FREE

UB Humanities Institute & Hallwalls present

Julia Jamrozik

Scholars @ Hallwalls

These monthly presentations feature one fellow's research in an engaging lecture with lively follow-up conversation. This year's lineup highlights the interdisciplinary range of humanities research at UB.

Talks are on Friday afternoons at 4 pm and are free and open to the public. Complimentary wine and hors d'oeuvres are served.

"Growing up Modern"

Julia Jamrozik (Assistant Professor, Architecture)

Julia Jamrozik will discuss the research project "Growing up Modern" which she began with Coryn Kempster in 2014. Through original interviews and photographs the project documents the memories and retrospections of children who grew up in some of the most iconic buildings of the early 20th century, such as the Tugendhat Villa in Brno or the Haus Schminke in Loebau. By speaking with the serendipitous inhabitants of architectural visions and documenting their dwellings through the lens of these recollections, the research presents the buildings from a point of view, that of the user, that is not common in architectural history.

 
 
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Tues.—Fri. 11-6
Sat. 11-2
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IN THE GALLERY
from Sep. 22, 2017
through Nov. 3, 2017
 

David Schirm
All The Glad Variety


Though distilled into broad symbolic forms or abstract landscapes, David Schirm's work often springs from his own experiences during the Vietnam War and paintings may allude to the scenes of horrific and senseless battles, the strafing of weapons across a landscape, "whose laser-like blazes of fired bullets gave a distinctive hum of un-worldliness to the darkness." Though his depictions of landscape forms even touch upon the pastoral in their depiction and use of color, Schirm's original point o ...