Media Arts Program
 


Saturday, March 31, 2001 — Friday, April 20, 2001

Co-sponsored/co-presented by:
The support of The New York State Council on The Arts

LIVING UNDER THE CLOUD: CHERNOBYL TODAY

Presented at:
Hallwalls

LIVING UNDER THE CLOUD: CHERNOBYL TODAY
LIVING UNDER THE CLOUD: CHERNOBYL TODAY
LIVING UNDER THE CLOUD: CHERNOBYL TODAY
LIVING UNDER THE CLOUD: CHERNOBYL TODAY

Opening of Photo exhibition by Joseph Sywenkyj and film screening featuring LIVING UNDER THE CLOUD: CHERNOBYL TODAY (Teresa Metcalf, US, 1994, video, 70min).In conjunction with the Children of Chornobyl Relief Fund benefit, the Hallwalls’ Media Program presents this important documentary on the ongoing impact of the Chornobyl nuclear accident. The work is a comprehensive exposé of the disaster and the contamination of human and natural systems in the area. It features rare home video footage shot by soldiers and workers who were sent into the reactor site in what were essentially suicide missions. This powerful film should awaken us to the magnitude of the problems that demand immediate action .Screening to benefit The Children of Chernobyl Relief Fund. (Suggested donation $5 - $10 Film screening of Living Under the Cloud: 8 pm)

Marking the 15th anniversary of the Chornobyl nuclear disaster and the 10th anniversary of the Children of Chornobyl Relief Fund, the Buffalo Chapter of CCRF presents the first of a series of commemorative fundraising events. There will be an opening reception of a photo exhibition by Joseph Sywenkyj, that will later travel to the United Nations, and the film screening of Living Under the Cloud by Teresa Metcalf (for more information about the documentary see film/video section). Come enjoy an evening of art, film, hors d’oeuvres and desserts donated by some of Buffalo’s finest restaurants, and wine and beer provided by local distributors. Information about CCRF and Chornobyl will be available at the receptionThis past summer the Children of Chornobyl Relief Fund (CCRF), a non-profit humanitarian aid organization which has delivered over 46 million dollars worth of aid to Ukraine, arranged for Joseph Sywenkyj to travel to Ukraine to document the aftereffects of radiation on children and the conditions in which many of these children live. He traveled for three weeks and photographed children with cancer and severe birth defects. He was touched by the courage of children who were undergoing cancer treatment. Many were only six or seven years old, yet they seemed to carry the weight of adulthood on their faces. In several orphanages, he witnessed and photographed an absolute nightmare. Half-naked children in tattered clothing lay on urine soaked wooden floors. Legs and bodies were contorted in every angle but straight. If all children are angels, these children had their wings clipped and were thrown into a living hell.

Chornobyl’s last operating reactor (#3) officially closed on December 15, 2000. The 15th anniversary of the disaster is on April 26, 2001. The public needs to be informed that exposure to the radioactive fallout of Chornobyl continues to destroy lives. The total number of those affected may not be realized for at least another fifteen years.

*The US Library of Congress and the National Geographic Society recommend the Ukrainian spelling of Chornobyl instead of "Chernobyl," the spelling used during the Soviet era.


Some publications related to this event:
April, 2001. - 2001
March, 2001 - 2001

 
 
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David Schirm
All The Glad Variety


Though distilled into broad symbolic forms or abstract landscapes, David Schirm's work often springs from his own experiences during the Vietnam War and paintings may allude to the scenes of horrific and senseless battles, the strafing of weapons across a landscape, "whose laser-like blazes of fired bullets gave a distinctive hum of un-worldliness to the darkness." Though his depictions of landscape forms even touch upon the pastoral in their depiction and use of color, Schirm's original point o ...