Media Arts Program
 


Thursday, October 4, 2007

Co-sponsored/co-presented by:
Electronic Recycling Technologies; Eyebeam's 2007 Artist-In-Residence Program; the University at Buffalo's 2020 Scholars Fund

Stephanie Rothenberg

Usernomics 1.0 Workshop

Presented at:
The Lounge in Asbury Hall

Usernomics 1.0 Workshop

in The Lounge at Asbury Hall

School of Perpetual Training presents Usernomics 1.0 - a hacktivist workshop employing models of waste reclamation, recycling and reuse.

In this user-friendly workshop, participants learn how to creatively repurpose old keyboards to create unique external computer interfaces. We begin with an overview of ewaste (electronic waste) and it's affect on the environment and outsourced, unskilled labor. You will then learn how to disassemble and "hack" USB keyboards to extend the circuitry and use various discarded goods, found objects and materials to create external controllers. We conclude with a competition using our new devices to control an onscreen "worker".

If interested, workshop participants will be able to demonstrate their controllers during the 8:00 pm performance that evening!

Participants are encouraged to bring their own laptops for testing keyboards and any discarded/broken products, found objects and materials that can be used to create external controllers.

Contact Stephanie at info@pan-o-matic.com for further information.

Download information about the Usernomics 1.0 Workshop (PDF, 232 kb)

Keyboards donated by Electronic Recycling Technologies www.ertrecycling.com
"School of Perpetual Training" is supported by the Eyebeam 2007 Artist-in-Residence Program and a University at Buffalo 2020 Scholars Fund


Some publications related to this event:
September, 2007 - 2007
October, 2007 - 2007

 
 
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Laylah Ali
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Laylah Ali's work explores power dynamics and interpersonal conflict through compositions that position culturally, racially and sexually ambiguous figures in precarious, loaded, and unexpectedly humorous situations. Ali uses concise—even minimal—imagery that is specific in rendering and intent. While there are narratives in Ali's work, they are stories whose open spaces often give them the atmosphere of fables.