Media Arts Program
 


Friday, April 9, 2010 at 8:00 p.m.

$8 general, $6 students/seniors, $5 members

Carnegie Art Center (North Tonawanda, NY) and a grant from the New York State Council on the Arts Electronic Media and Film Program

Scan Lines

Hallwalls is pleased to host a screening of feminist videos that explore female interiority in public space. Curated by Stella Marrs, the program features works by Kate Gilmore, Heather Keung, Eileen Maxson, and Shannon Plumb among others. The screening precedes the opening of Scan Lines, an exhibition at the Carnegie Art Center, on view April 10 through May 15.

FEATURING:

Heather Keung: Handstand (2006, 4 min)

Kate Gilmore: With Open Arms (2005, 5 min); Walk this Way (2008, 5 min)

Eileen Maxson: Tonight (Reprise) (2005, 3 min); Date with Deceit (2009, 5 min)

Shannon Plumb: Shalmont Field (2004, 3 min); Rattles and Cherries (2004, 5 min); Paper Collection (2007, 19 min); Together (2008, 29 min)

ABOUT THE ARTISTS:

Heather Keung is a Canadian artist. Her recent video, installation and performance art practice is inspired by physical labor, involuntary actions, and the training of the mind and body. Keung is the Artistic Director of the 2010 Toronto Reel Asian International Film Festival.

Kate Gilmore is in this year's Whitney Biennial. In review after review that hashes out the pros and con’s of WB 2010, she is mentioned on the plus side. Kate Gilmore’s work explores themes of displacement, struggle, and female identity. She is the sole protagonist in her performative videos, in which she attempts to conquer self-constructed obstacles. Clean. Hot. Now.

Eileen Maxson is a video and installation artist from Texas. Currently she is an artist in residence at de Ateliers in Amsterdam. In 2006, Maxson was called "...a transmedia Cindy Sherman for the MySpace generation..." by New York Village Voice media critic Ed Halter.

Shannon Plumb is a highly original new artist working in the spirit of slapstick comedy and the physical humor of silent film legends such as Buster Keaton and Charlie Chaplin. Plumb employs a low-fi aesthetic by using Super-8 film, stationary camera shots, long takes and hand-made props and costumes. Plumb is a one-woman show starring as all characters and acting as the creative force behind her films. The low quality production of the films and the charm of her work and pushes it beyond its obvious predecessors and influences.


Some publications related to this event:
April and May, 2010 - 2010

 
 
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IN THE GALLERY
from Nov. 10, 2017
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Laylah Ali
Paintings and Drawings


Laylah Ali's work explores power dynamics and interpersonal conflict through compositions that position culturally, racially and sexually ambiguous figures in precarious, loaded, and unexpectedly humorous situations. Ali uses concise—even minimal—imagery that is specific in rendering and intent. While there are narratives in Ali's work, they are stories whose open spaces often give them the atmosphere of fables.