Media Arts Program
 


Friday, November 12, 2010 at 8:00 p.m.

$8 General, $6 Students & Seniors, $5 Members

Beyond/In WNY 2010: Alternating Currents

"the edit bin is freaky deep" : FASTWÜRMS Migrations and Remixes

Beyond/In Western New York 2010

FASTWURMS During the 1970s, just before the explosion of consumer video effectively annihilated small-gauge formats, many media artists worked with the inexpensive and nearly fail-proof Super 8 film. Like their punk counterparts in NYC, who used DIY tactics to generate a "Cinema of Transgression," media artists were creating a vital underground film scene in Toronto. One example is the early work of FASTWÜRMS, the cultural project and joint authorship of Kim Kozzi and Dai Skuse, who have collaborated since 1979. Widely known for their performances and site-specific installations, FASTWÜRMS actually began with Super 8. Their name was inspired by a fast-paced editing process in which films were dissected then reassembled using hundreds of second-long, 18-frame "wurms." FASTWÜRMS continues to produce time-based experiments using available technologies like digital video, which they use to document events and performances. At Hallwalls, FASTWÜRMS will present a number of transferred short films and recent videos. Telepathacats (2003) shows the artists, who are practicing witches, in a blinding field of snow surrounded by a number of their beloved cats. Dressed in the stereotypical pointed black hats, they make slow hand gestures to the cats who run by them, turn and glance, or blithely move about. The footage is mixed with scenes of a scientist gesturing in a similar way to another man as he positions a machine. What was considered the most dangerous aspect of Paganism—a reverence for the natural world and the worship of animals—appears harmless when juxtaposed with the veneration for the machine these men display in the lab. "Our mythology is all about representation and Witch positivity," they have stated, "a pagan counter narrative about reclaiming, turning misplaced evil back into good, making ugly into nice."


Some publications related to this event:
October and November, 2010 - 2010

 
 
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IN THE GALLERY
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Laylah Ali
Paintings and Drawings


Laylah Ali's work explores power dynamics and interpersonal conflict through compositions that position culturally, racially and sexually ambiguous figures in precarious, loaded, and unexpectedly humorous situations. Ali uses concise—even minimal—imagery that is specific in rendering and intent. While there are narratives in Ali's work, they are stories whose open spaces often give them the atmosphere of fables.