Media Arts Program
 


Monday, February 28, 2011 at 7:30 p.m.

UB Institute for Research on Women and Gender presents

Portraiture in Queer Experimental Cinema

Center for Fine Arts Screening Room (CFA 112)
State University at Buffalo

Curated by Ed Halter, sponsored by the Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery

A selection of film and video by queer artists, spanning half a century, that looks at how various aspects of portraiture play out within a variety of approaches to experimental cinema. The program includes work by Kenneth Anger, Andy Warhol, Gregory Markopoulos, Su Friedrich, Barbara Hammer, Sadie Benning and others.

Program:

Kenneth Anger - Puce Moment
Kenneth Anger, Puce Moment, 1949, 16mm, sound, 6 mins
Andy Warhol - Mario Banana
Andy Warhol, Mario Banana #1, 1964, 16mm, silent, 4 mins
Andy Warhol, Mario Banana #2, 1964, 16mm, silent 4 mins
Edward Owens, Private Imaginings and Narrative Facts, 1967, 16mm, silent, 9 mins
Gregory Markopoulos, Ming Green, 1966, 16mm, sound, 7 mins
Barbara Hammer - Dyketactics
Barbara Hammer, Dyketactics, 1974, 16mm, sound, 4 mins
Su Friedrich - Cool Hands Warm Heart
Su Friedrich, Cool Hands, Warm Heart, 1979, 16mm, silent, 14 mins
George Kuchar -  I An Actress
George Kuchar, I, An Actress, 1977, 16mm, sound, 9 mins
Sadie Benning, If Every Girl Had a Diary, 1990, video, 8 mins
Glen Fogel, Endless Obsession, 2000, 16mm, sound, 6 mins

Running time 71 mins

Ed Halter is a critic and curator living in New York City. His writing has appeared in Afterall, Artforum, The Believer, The Village Voice and other elsewhere, and he is a 2009 recipient of the Creative Capital | Warhol Foundation Arts Writers Grant. He currently teaches at Bard College, and is a founder and director of Light Industry, a venue for film and electronic art in Brooklyn, New York.

 
 
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Laylah Ali's work explores power dynamics and interpersonal conflict through compositions that position culturally, racially and sexually ambiguous figures in precarious, loaded, and unexpectedly humorous situations. Ali uses concise—even minimal—imagery that is specific in rendering and intent. While there are narratives in Ali's work, they are stories whose open spaces often give them the atmosphere of fables.