Media Arts Program
 


Tuesday, November 20, 1979

Co-sponsored/co-presented by:
The Young Filmmakers/Video Arts Film Bureau

VIVIENNE DICK

Presented at:
Hallwalls

Screening of BEAUTY AND THE BEAST [BEAUTY BECOMES THE BEAST] and other films, presented in person by filmmaker Vivienne Dick.

[While this film is listed in Hallwalls' written records as "Beauty and the Beast," this is most likely a typo or a working title for what is now known as BEAUTY BECOMES THE BEAST (1979, 41 min.), Vivienne Dick's collaboration with Lydia Lunch. In "Direct: Vivienne Dick's Work with Lydia Lunch" which appeared in the No. 5 Issue of Experimental Conversations (Winter 2009/2010) Chris O'Neill writes: "…once one tunes in to its wavelength, Dick's intentions become very clear. It is pure visceral filmmaking that dispenses with traditional storytelling clarification and instead goads an emotional response through the constant juxtaposition of imagery and sound design. The themes of decay, sexuality, death, and, most prominently, abuse, all mirrored against the breakdown of society, resonate powerfully throughout the film and articulate a frustrated anger that probably could not be captured by a conventional narrative." Later O'Neill quotes Dick on Lunch's performance: "According to Dick, the theme of abuse was never discussed during the making of the film but, as she states, 'You see something that affects you—like her performance, her band—and it seeps into your skin pores, you take it in and withouth consciously or intellectually thinking it starts coming out in your own work.'  The entire article by O'Neill was accessed on Oct. 12, 2010 at:
http://www.experimentalconversations.com/articles/484/direct-vivienne-dicks-work-with-lydia-lunch/
~ C.T.]


Some publications related to this event:
November, 1979. - 1979

 
 
341 DELAWARE AVE.
BUFFALO, NY 14202
t: 716-854-1694
f: 716-854-1696

 
GALLERY HOURS:
Tues.—Fri. 11-6
Sat. 11-2
Sun. & Mon. closed

IN THE GALLERY
from Nov. 10, 2017
through Dec. 22, 2017
 

Laylah Ali
Paintings and Drawings


Laylah Ali's work explores power dynamics and interpersonal conflict through compositions that position culturally, racially and sexually ambiguous figures in precarious, loaded, and unexpectedly humorous situations. Ali uses concise—even minimal—imagery that is specific in rendering and intent. While there are narratives in Ali's work, they are stories whose open spaces often give them the atmosphere of fables.