Music Program
 


Thursday, November 2, 2000

Co-sponsored/co-presented by:
Hallwalls

JEMEEL MOONDOC/WILLIAM PARKER DUO

Presented at:
Big Orbit Gallery

Anyone who experienced the sounds of contra bassist William Parker at the amazing Quagmire performance in September can attest that he is undoubtedly among the world’s greatest bassists. He plays with an intense purity and seemingly limitless vocabulary that is unquestionably William Parker. After just four weeks, Parker will return to Hallwalls with his friend and collaborator for over twenty years, alto saxophonist Jemeel Moondoc, also one of the most singular voices in this realm of free music expression.

"They seem to know where the other is all the time…their improvisations intertwine in spontaneous counterpoint, without one player self-consciously following the other. Each improvisation retains its individuality, yet neither could exist without the other. Separate yet mutual, Moondoc and Parker jointly form a work of art that is organic, whole, …the highest level on which music is played. That human cry in Parker’s bass and Moondoc’s alto evokes some very powerful feelings. I hear compassion and anger, vulnerability and strength, but deepest of all, perhaps, a sadness that would be almost unendurable if it were not examined and transformed, somehow, into beauty. This is not happy music at all and yet it is without question uplifting." –Ed Hazell on Parker and Moondoc’s performance at the 1998 Fire in the Valley Festival.


Some publications related to this event:
November, 2000. - 2000

 
 
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All The Glad Variety


Though distilled into broad symbolic forms or abstract landscapes, David Schirm's work often springs from his own experiences during the Vietnam War and paintings may allude to the scenes of horrific and senseless battles, the strafing of weapons across a landscape, "whose laser-like blazes of fired bullets gave a distinctive hum of un-worldliness to the darkness." Though his depictions of landscape forms even touch upon the pastoral in their depiction and use of color, Schirm's original point o ...