Music Program
 


Wednesday, September 5, 2007

Eye Contact

Presented at:
Hallwalls

Matt Lavelle (trumpet, bass clarinet)
Matthew Heyner (contrabass)
Ryan Sawyer (drums, percussion)

War Rug is the group's studio debut and follows two live CD-Rs on the Utech label. Eye Contact might loosely be termed free jazz, but the reality is far more complex, as a typical performance finds them drawing on elements of free improv, Latin music, metal, drone, and psychedelic, to create a very unique sound.

Matt Lavelle is best known as a member of William Parker's Little Huey Creative Music Orchestra. His discography also includes work with Sabir Mateen, Assif Tsahar, Steve Swell, Ras Moshe and Daniel Carter.

Matt Heyner is one of the most in-demand bass players in New York City. He has toured internationally with the legendary improv unit NoNeck Blues Band, and is also well-known for his work in TEST with Daniel Carter, Sabir Mateen and Tom Bruno. His current working groups include those of Sabir Mateen, Ras Moshe and Steve Swell, and he has had previous work with Thurston Moore, Chris Corsano, Paul Flaherty, Okkyung Lee and Samara Lubelski.

Ryan Sawyer was among the founding members of mythic Texas punkers At The Drive-In. He moved to New York, studied with Bobby Previte, played with Tony Malaby and Bruce Eisenbeil and is now a member of indie rockers Tall Firs and improv orchestra Stars Like Fleas.

Some praise for their work:
"It's the real thing: raw, live avant-garde jazz recorded in New York City, music that soars and uplifts and ignores all boundaries."—Florence Wetzel, AllAboutJazz.com


Some publications related to this event:
September, 2007 - 2007

 
 
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Laylah Ali
Paintings and Drawings


Laylah Ali's work explores power dynamics and interpersonal conflict through compositions that position culturally, racially and sexually ambiguous figures in precarious, loaded, and unexpectedly humorous situations. Ali uses concise—even minimal—imagery that is specific in rendering and intent. While there are narratives in Ali's work, they are stories whose open spaces often give them the atmosphere of fables.