Music Program
 


Tuesday, October 9, 2012 at 8:00 p.m.

$15 general, $12 students/seniors, $10 members

Trio X

Joe McPhee (saxophones, trumpet)
Dominic Duval (contrabass)
Jay Rosen (drums)

Since his emergence on the creative jazz and new music scene in the late 1960s, Joe McPhee has been a deeply emotional composer, improviser, and multi-instrumentalist, as well as a thoughtful conceptualist and theoretician. Born on November 3, 1939, in Miami, McPhee first began playing the trumpet at age eight. He continued on that instrument through high school and then in a U.S. Army band stationed in Germany; during his Army stint, he was first introduced to traditional jazz. Clifford Thornton's Freedom and Unity, recorded in 1967 and released in 1969, became the first recording on which McPhee appears. In 1968, he began playing the saxophone and since has investigated a wide range of instruments (including pocket trumpet, clarinet, valve trombone, and piano), with active involvement in both acoustic and electronic music. As the 1990s drew to a close, McPhee discovered two like-minded improvisers in bassist Dominic Duval and drummer Jay Rosen.

"A group whose repertoire is based around classics by Monk, Ornette and even Freddie Hubbard, alongside standards and gospel tunes, is not exactly pushing the envelope, right? Well, not in the case of Trio X, comprising master musicians Joe McPhee, Dominic Duval and Jay Rosen. They share an affinity for well known tunes, but refined through distinctly avant garde sensibilities. McPhee has forged unlikely but rewarding partnerships around the globe, working with everyone from Evan Parker to William Parker. Duval has been bassist of choice for Cecil Taylor for much of the last decade, while his frequent cohort Rosen has also stoked the fires of veterans such as Sonny Simmons and Charles Gayle.

Trio X, monikered after an appearance at NYC's Vision Festival which failed to register on the critical radar, have been together for over ten years, releasing seven albums on the CIMP/Cadence labels during that time."

"Themes would suddenly appear like a picture coming into focus, only to be spun off at a tangent, until they were subsumed back into he musical ebb and flow. The band played seven pieces plus an encore, largely improvised in the moment, but often touching on familiar themes. "My Funny Valentine" and "Goin' Home" were both referenced, played with great tenderness by McPhee, for who these tunes clearly have a deep emotional resonance. Other pieces developed organically, from the pattering of McPhee's keypads, or a simple blues motif from Duval, before being taken on a journey into the unknown.


McPhee stuck to tenor saxophone for most of the set, apart from one short excursion on pocket trumpet. His penchant for contrasting the lyrical with the abstract, sometimes within the space of a few notes, was a constant feature. Such is McPhee's talent for extemporising achingly beautiful melancholy themes, that it was difficult to tell if he was following his muse or touching on some obscure gospel tune. McPhee embraced not only straight playing, albeit often with a hoarse vibrato adding to the emotional weight of his line, but also circular breathing, altissimo wailing, guttural swathes of sound and percussive keypad popping, in a magisterial display of the saxophonic arts."

triox.org

This concert is made possible through the generous support of Robert D. Bielecki (www.fastorbit.com).

 
 
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