Literature Program
 


Friday, November 3, 2000 — Sunday, November 12, 2000

Co-sponsored/co-presented by:
HAG Theatre, SHADES, University at Buffalo, Department of Women's Studies and University at Buffalo's Institute for Research and Education on Women and Gender.

WAYS IN BEING GAY

Presented at:
Hallwalls

AN EVIDENCE OF LETTERS. [Postponed until early 2001?]

[NOTE: Originally presented as a staged reading to a sold-out house during Ways In Being Gay 1998, its development supported in part by a Theater Commission grant from the Individual Artists program of the New York State Council on the Arts (NYSCA) and a SOS grant from the Arts Council in Buffalo & Erie County, Evidence of Letters returned (but was ultimately postponed) for Ways in Being Gay 2000 as a fully realized production created and performed by noted author and performer Alexis De Veaux and theater artist Renée Armstrong. It is based on the real life letter correspondence between two Black women who lived in Hartford, Connecticut in the nineteenth century, and follows their relationship as it is affected by the slavery question, the Abolitionist Movement, and the Civil War. Combining historical and contemporary perspectives, it moves back and forth between the 19th and 20th centuries as it explores the homoerotic aspect of Black women’s friendships. The collaboration of De Veaux and Armstrong brings to this new work more than twenty years each of artistic experience, as well as a shared commitment to creative exploration that brings to the stage Black women’s lives.]


Some publications related to this event:
September, 2000 - 2000
November, 2000. - 2000

 
 
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IN THE GALLERY
from Sep. 22, 2017
through Nov. 3, 2017
 

David Schirm
All The Glad Variety


Though distilled into broad symbolic forms or abstract landscapes, David Schirm's work often springs from his own experiences during the Vietnam War and paintings may allude to the scenes of horrific and senseless battles, the strafing of weapons across a landscape, "whose laser-like blazes of fired bullets gave a distinctive hum of un-worldliness to the darkness." Though his depictions of landscape forms even touch upon the pastoral in their depiction and use of color, Schirm's original point o ...