Literature Program
 


Saturday, November 8, 2003

Co-sponsored/co-presented by:
The University at Buffalo's Electronic Poetry Center

Steve McCaffery

Presented at:
Hallwalls Black n Blue Theatre

Steve McCaffery, born in England, emigrated to Canada partly to work with the late bp Nichol, with whom he co-founded the Toronto Research Group. McCaffery and Nichol also combined talents with Paul Dutton and Rafael Barreto-Rivera as the acclaimed Four Horsemen, creating and performing innovative sound poetry. During the ‘70s and ‘80s, he and Nichol were regular contributors to the seminal poetics journal Open Letter. He is author of the recent Seven Pages Missing: The Selected Steve McCaffery, and co-editor of Imagining Language: An Anthology. McCaffery’s collection of critical writings, North of Intention, stands as one of the earliest and best collections of essays about experimental writing in Canada and the U.S. It demonstrates and explores McCaffery’s own affiliation with the practitioners of the so-called "Language Poetry" and poetics, often considered a uniquely American phenomenon. McCaffery teaches at York University. This free event at Hallwalls, presented by the UB Poetics Program and epc, will provide a rare and historic performance of McCaffery’s sound poetry, a body of work that has changed the history of this medium of expression worldwide.


Some publications related to this event:
October and November, 2003. - 2003

 
 
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Laylah Ali
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Laylah Ali's work explores power dynamics and interpersonal conflict through compositions that position culturally, racially and sexually ambiguous figures in precarious, loaded, and unexpectedly humorous situations. Ali uses concise—even minimal—imagery that is specific in rendering and intent. While there are narratives in Ali's work, they are stories whose open spaces often give them the atmosphere of fables.