Literature Program
 


Monday, March 28, 2005

Co-sponsored/co-presented by:
The University of Buffalo, Department of English

Kathryn Davis

EXHIBIT X

Presented at:
Hallwalls, 700 Main St.

Kathryn Davis Kathryn Davis’s books not only defy easy description, but tend to elicit inadequate book-chat clichés like ‘hypnotic’ and ‘haunting’ to convey their astonishing effects. Davis’s approach to novel writing is so original, and the results so magical, that trying to review her fiction in a thousand words on a tight deadline feels as doomed as trying to review … one of your own dreams.” — A.O. Scott, Newsday

Monday, March 28, 2005 • 7:00 P.M.
EXHIBIT X presents a reading by
Kathryn Davis
Hallwalls (Con) temporary Art Center (temporary storefront gallery)
700 Main Street, in the downtown Theater District
FREE

Kathryn Davis has received a Kafka Prize, the 1999 Morton Dauwen Zabel Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, and a Guggenheim Fellowship. She is also the author of the novels Labrador, The Girl Who Trod on a Loaf, The Walking Tour, Hell and Versailles. Davis teaches at Skidmore College in Saratoga Springs, New York and lives with her husband and daughter in Vermont.

"Davis's writing is so extraordinarily visual that she is practically a video artist."

— The New Yorker

"I like to think of Kathryn Davis as the love child of Virginia Woolf and Lewis Carroll, with a splash of Nabokov, Emily Bronte, and Angela Carter in the gene pool."
— Joy Press, Village Voice


Exhibit X is a co-presentation of Hallwalls and the UB English Dept., which funds the ongoing series. Writers are selected and introduced by Christina Milletti.

 
 
341 DELAWARE AVE.
BUFFALO, NY 14202
t: 716-854-1694
f: 716-854-1696

 
GALLERY HOURS:
Tues.—Fri. 11-6
Sat. 11-2
Sun. & Mon. closed

IN THE GALLERY
from Sep. 22, 2017
through Nov. 3, 2017
 

David Schirm
All The Glad Variety


Though distilled into broad symbolic forms or abstract landscapes, David Schirm's work often springs from his own experiences during the Vietnam War and paintings may allude to the scenes of horrific and senseless battles, the strafing of weapons across a landscape, "whose laser-like blazes of fired bullets gave a distinctive hum of un-worldliness to the darkness." Though his depictions of landscape forms even touch upon the pastoral in their depiction and use of color, Schirm's original point o ...