Literature Program
 


Wednesday, April 11, 2007

Co-sponsored/co-presented by:
Earth's Daughters Collective

Joy Walsh & Helen Ruggieri

The Gray Hair Reading Series

Presented at:
Hallwalls

Joy Walsh is the author of several volumes of poetry, including Locating Positions (Backstreet, 1983), Hymn to Prometheus Transistor (Atticus Press, 1984), The Absent are Always in the Wrong (Water Row Press, 1985), Mary Magdalen Sings the Mass in Ordinary Time (Alpha Beat Press, 1989), and Obsessions (Authorhouse, 2000).

Walsh is also internationally known as a scholar of the Beats. From 1978-1994 she was editor and publisher of Moody Street Irregulars: A Jack Kerouac Newsletter (past issues of which are now collector's items available on eBay), and author of Jack Kerouac: Statement in Brown (Esprit critique series, Textile Bridge Press, 1984.) She was a co-editor of Earth's Daughters magazine for many years. In 1983, she received a writer-in-residence grant from Just Buffalo Literary Center. Her poetry, essays, and reviews have been published in the United States, Europe, Australia, and Japan.

Helen Ruggieri is an award-winning poet who resides in Olean, NY. Currently a Professor of English at the University of Pittsburgh in Bradford, PA, she also teaches in the Arts in Education Program in Cattaraugus, Allegany, and Chautauqua counties, and previously taught at Jamestown Community College. She spent a semester teaching in Japan at Yokohama College of Commerce, and is a member of the East Asian Faculty Association at Pitt. She was also editor and publisher of Allegany Mountain Press.

Ruggieri is the author of eight books of poetry, including The Poetess (Uroborus Books, 1981), Concrete Madonna (S & S Press, 1982), Glimmer Girls (Mayapple Press, 1999), and The Character for Women (Foothills Publishing, 2002). During her semester in Japan, she became interested in Japanese verse forms. The Character for Spirit, her book of haiku, senryu, and haibun (short prose) is forthcoming from Foothills, and previously appeared in publications in Japan (Mainichi Daily News, Yomiuri Daily, and World Haiku Review), as well as in England, Belgium, Russia, Slovakia, and Turkey. She has won several awards for haiku from Japanese publications, and teaches workshops on Japanese verse forms.

Ruggieri has had more than 200 poems published in magazines, including Earth's Daughters, Poetry, River Styx, Blue Line, Snowy Egret, Sports Literate, Journal of New Jersey Poets, Hawaii Pacific Review, del sol review, Valparaiso, Hiram Poetry Review, Coal City Review, Spoon River Poetry Review, Minnesota Review, Labor, Icon, Red River Review, Poetry Midwest, and Adirondack Review. She has also written creative non-fiction, including a recent collection of memoirs/essays about her time in Japan. Other prose publications include an essay, ÒHoly Ghost at Heart Lake,Ó in Illuminations: Expressions of the Personal Spiritual Experience (Celestial Arts Publications); ÒHome is Where You Keep Your StuffÓ in How I learned to Cook (Putnam/Tarcher); Fragmentary Writing (Impassio Press); and Horse Crazy (Adams Publications). In 2001, she received a Sasakawa Fellowship from the Nippon Foundation. Other awards include the Allen Ginsberg Prize from William Paterson College of New Jersey, the Artists Embassy International poetry prize, and an award from the Academy of American Poets.

Earth's Daughters magazine, the oldest continuously published feminist literary arts periodical in the U.S., is currently celebrating its 36th year. Publication of Earth's Daughters magazine is made possible by a NYSCA Decentralization grant from the Arts Council in Buffalo & Erie County.


Some publications related to this event:
April, 2007 - 2007

 
 
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IN THE GALLERY
from Sep. 22, 2017
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David Schirm
All The Glad Variety


Though distilled into broad symbolic forms or abstract landscapes, David Schirm's work often springs from his own experiences during the Vietnam War and paintings may allude to the scenes of horrific and senseless battles, the strafing of weapons across a landscape, "whose laser-like blazes of fired bullets gave a distinctive hum of un-worldliness to the darkness." Though his depictions of landscape forms even touch upon the pastoral in their depiction and use of color, Schirm's original point o ...