Literature Program
 


Thursday, September 24, 2015 at 7:00 p.m.

FREE

The UB English Dept., its MA Program in English/Innovative Writing, & Hallwalls present

Shelley Jackson

Exhibit X

shelley jackson
Shelley Jackson was extracted from the bum leg of a water buffalo in 1963 in the Philippines and grew up complaining in Berkeley, California. She has spent most of her life in used bookstores, smearing unidentified substances on their spines, and is duly obsessed with books: paper, glue, and ink. After first reading at Hallwalls' old "Black 'n' Blue Theatre" at Tri-Main Center in the inaugural season of Exhibit X in 2004, she published Half Life, a 440-page novel about conjoined twins, chosen as one of the Village Voice's favorite books of 2006. Jackson is also the author of the story collection The Melancholy of Anatomy; the acclaimed hypertexts Patchwork Girl (a reworking of the Frankenstein myth), The Doll Games, and My Body; and several illustrated children's books, including The Old Woman & the Wave and Sophia, the Alchemist's Dog. Her stories and essays for grown-ups have appeared in numerous journals and anthologies including Grand StreetConjunctions, and Paris Review, and she is the recipient of a Pushcart Prize and a Howard Foundation grant. She lives in Brooklyn and teaches at Pratt Institute and the New School. She continues her ongoing project of tattooing a story entitled Skin on volunteers, one word at a time, and more recently has initiated an Instagram based environmental fiction called Snow at: https://instagram.com/snowshelleyjackson/. Her latest piece, "Texts to be Written on the Moon" is part of a current exhibit at the Guggenheim Foundation, available at: http://exhibitions.guggenheim.org/storylines.

Jackson is currently serving as UB's 2015–2016 WBFO Visiting Professor of the Arts.

 
 
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IN THE GALLERY
from Nov. 10, 2017
through Dec. 22, 2017
 

Laylah Ali
Paintings and Drawings


Laylah Ali's work explores power dynamics and interpersonal conflict through compositions that position culturally, racially and sexually ambiguous figures in precarious, loaded, and unexpectedly humorous situations. Ali uses concise—even minimal—imagery that is specific in rendering and intent. While there are narratives in Ali's work, they are stories whose open spaces often give them the atmosphere of fables.