publications
 
THE FILMIC ART OF PAUL SHARITS


Published in 2000
Curated by Nancy Weekly
Essays by Charlotta Kotik, Anthony Bannon, John G. Hanhardt

THE FILMIC ART OF PAUL SHARITS Burchfield-Penney Art Center and Buffalo State College, Buffalo, NY, 2000. [A thirty-two page color booklet published in conjunction with the exhibition of the same title. Includes an introduction by Nancy Weekly (Curator, Burchfield-Penney Art Center), the essay "Painter Behind the Celluloid" by Charlotta Kotik (Curator, Brookyln Museum of Art), the essay "Interrogating the Cinematic Apparatus: Notes on '3rd Degree' by Paul Sharits" by John G. Hanhardt (Curator, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum), and the essay "A Sketch" by Anthony Bannon (Director, George Eastman House). Includes color photos of work by Paul Sharits, a chronology of Sharits' life and work, a checklist of the eponymous exhibition, a film program for the works presented at Hallwalls, and a list of faculty at Burchfield-Penney Art Center. The full exhibition was presented at Burchfield-Penney Art Center February 26-May 21, 2000. The booklet was designed by Karl Scheitheir of SKA Graphics Ltd.]

Artists associated with this publication:
Paul Sharits


Some events connected to this publication:
March 17, 2000 - PAUL SHARITS RETROSPECTIVE:
March 19, 2000 - PAUL SHARITS RETROSPECTIVE:
March 22, 2000 - PAUL SHARITS RETROSPECTIVE:
September 23, 2000 - PAUL SHARITS PANEL DISCUSSION



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IN THE GALLERY
from Sep. 12, 2014
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Michael Mararian
Kinder Kavalcade


It's not that Michael Mararian's paintings are about children, but children serve as the central protagonists in much of his work. Painted with equal proportions of dark humor and buoyant charm, children function as the most effective dramatic foils for the contradictions, absurdities, and layers of pathos Mararian is fond of exploring. Whether brandishing lit matches and gasoline, wearing inappropriate clothing, wielding knives and guns, or just lying in a drunken stupor upon a field of cell phones, children as characters sharply highlight an array of themes and concerns discussed throughout Mararian's work.