Visual Arts Program
 


Saturday, January 12, 2008 — Saturday, February 16, 2008

Megan Greene

Rappacini's Daughter

Megan Greene - <em>Rappacini's Daughter</em>
Megan Greene - <em>Rappacini's Daughter</em>

Megan Greene's detailed white on black drawings combine the forms of flora, feathers, hair and jewelry in manners Baroque and tribal. The careful topiary-like displays of such feminine ornaments both heighten and belie their frivolity, appearance of purpose and fetishistic quality. Greene's work shows her interest in mammals, birds, deep-sea creatures and insects to an effect reminiscent of Victorian naturalist drawings. These organic elements become ghostly, hermaphroditic and ornamental.

In each drawing, the strange composite of such components suggests themes transcendent of each literal part: of elegance and delicacy mixed with the macabre, of body parts and biological specimen through the incarnation of the prehistoric and futuristic, and of cultural artifact, be it headdress or totem. The subject of these drawings lies in the intentionally ambiguous interplay of these various qualities.

Kinz, Tillou + Feigen Gallery

To view publication, please visit our archives.


Some publications related to this event:
MEGAN GREENE: RAPPACCINI'S DAUGHTER - 2008
February, 2008 - 2008
December, 2007 and January, 2008 - 2007

 
 
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David Schirm
All The Glad Variety


Though distilled into broad symbolic forms or abstract landscapes, David Schirm's work often springs from his own experiences during the Vietnam War and paintings may allude to the scenes of horrific and senseless battles, the strafing of weapons across a landscape, "whose laser-like blazes of fired bullets gave a distinctive hum of un-worldliness to the darkness." Though his depictions of landscape forms even touch upon the pastoral in their depiction and use of color, Schirm's original point o ...