Visual Arts Program
 


Saturday, January 17, 2009 — Saturday, February 21, 2009

Lee Goreas

Stars & Pars

Lee Goreas - <em>Stars and Pars</em>
Lee Goreas - <em>Stars and Pars</em>
Lee Goreas - <em>Stars and Pars</em>
Lee Goreas - <em>Stars and Pars</em>

New works about Astronomy, Golf and Art History

37 years ago in early February 1971 astronaut Alan Shepard became the person to hit a golf ball on the surface of the moon. He used a makeshift six iron and two balls he smuggled onto Apollo 14. Before he left the surface of the moon he hit both balls into the landscape of the moon.

Toronto artist Lee Goreas' current body of work brings together four things of great importance to the artist: drawing, astronomy, sculpture and golf. Within these seemingly disparate subjects are a raft of cross-current and connections that touch upon ideas of scale, mass, time, space and history.

The pencil crayon drawings for Stars & Pars combine art history with popular culture—more specifically, the popular sport of golf is combined with the less popular history of Modern sculpture. Within each drawing, a sculpture by a historically-significant artist is situated within an imaginary golf course landscape in a humorous and ludicrous hybrid. Respect for the integrity and importance of the sculptures—and the lush modernism of imagined greens—is maintained as a new aesthetic terrain is suggested. Included in Goreas' hypothetical Post Modern Sculpture Park are works by Rachel Whiteread, Robert Smithson, Joseph Beuys and Louise Bourgeois.

SEE: www.birchlibralato.com

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Some publications related to this event:
LEE GOREAS: STARS AND PARS - 2009
January, 2009 - 2009
February, 2009 - 2009

 
 
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Laylah Ali's work explores power dynamics and interpersonal conflict through compositions that position culturally, racially and sexually ambiguous figures in precarious, loaded, and unexpectedly humorous situations. Ali uses concise—even minimal—imagery that is specific in rendering and intent. While there are narratives in Ali's work, they are stories whose open spaces often give them the atmosphere of fables.