Visual Arts Program
 


Saturday, March 20, 2004 — Saturday, April 24, 2004

Melissa Pearl Friedling, Julian Montague

Presented at:
Hallwalls Project Room

PROJECT ROOMS:
Exhibitions by the 2002 ISP (International Studio Program) Resident Artists

Melissa Pearl Friedling
In her recent work, Melissa Pearl Friedling has been appropriating mythic morality tales (such as The Princess and the Pea) for a series of short films and videos that are, ultimately, more personal than aprocryphal. Friedling combines found film footage with hand-drawn animation and live action in order to unsettle the distinctions beween memory and autobiography; innocence and vulgarity; romance and sexuality; and fiction and reality.

Melissa Pearl Friedling
Repunzel, 2003, animation still

Melissa Pearl Friedling
The Princess and the Pea Stain, 2003
animation still

Julian Montague
Over the last several years, a significant body of Julian Montague’s work has involved developing an original an iconoclastic photo-taxonomy of shopping carts diverted from their original use, such as strays, abandoned carts and destroyed carts (among many other categories). The resulting system includes two classes and thirty sub-types of categorization. More than a photo-essay on our contemporary urban landscapes (though it also functions as this), Montague’s absurd and thorough vocabulary treats this mundane phenomenon in a way that highlights the effects of language and scientific classification, particularly as a means to impose order and exert control, thereby bringing into question the very methodology with which it is framed.


Some publications related to this event:
March, April and May, 2004 - 2004

 
 
341 DELAWARE AVE.
BUFFALO, NY 14202
t: 716-854-1694
f: 716-854-1696

 
GALLERY HOURS:
Tues.—Fri. 11-6
Sat. 11-2
Sun. & Mon. closed

IN THE GALLERY
from Nov. 10, 2017
through Dec. 22, 2017
 

Laylah Ali
Paintings and Drawings


Laylah Ali's work explores power dynamics and interpersonal conflict through compositions that position culturally, racially and sexually ambiguous figures in precarious, loaded, and unexpectedly humorous situations. Ali uses concise—even minimal—imagery that is specific in rendering and intent. While there are narratives in Ali's work, they are stories whose open spaces often give them the atmosphere of fables.