Visual Arts Program
 


Friday, January 11, 2013 — Friday, March 1, 2013

Vascular Modes

<em>Vascular Modes</em>
<em>Vascular Modes</em>
<em>Vascular Modes</em>
<em>Vascular Modes</em>
<em>Vascular Modes</em>
<em>Vascular Modes</em>
<em>Vascular Modes</em>
<em>Vascular Modes</em>
<em>Vascular Modes</em>
<em>Vascular Modes</em>
<em>Vascular Modes</em>
<em>Vascular Modes</em>
<em>Vascular Modes</em>
<em>Vascular Modes</em>
<em>Vascular Modes</em>
<em>Vascular Modes</em>
<em>Vascular Modes</em>
<em>Vascular Modes</em>
<em>Vascular Modes</em>
<em>Vascular Modes</em>
<em>Vascular Modes</em>

Jozef BajusAdrian BertoloneMichael Bosworth
Kyle ButlerScott ByeFotini Galanes
Kate GaudyAmy GreenanJody Hanson
Phil HastingsLesley HorowitzCarl Lee
Joan LinderDennis MaherMark McLoughlin
Julian MontagueJan NagleAlicia Paolucci
Kate ParzychJean-Michel ReedJason Seeley


Opening Reception
Friday. January 11, 8pm

Artists' Documentary
(in lieu of an artist's talk)
Friday. January 11, 8pm

In a city where preservation issues have taken a front seat in our cultural and social thinking, particularly during the last decade, it's never insignificant to lionize the cultural past. At Hallwalls, we revere our own past and that of our community. Since January of 2006, Hallwalls has been the main tenant of Babeville, the refurbished Delaware Asbury Church in downtown Buffalo.

At the same time, Hallwalls has always been about the present moment, about current artistic impulses, and about the creation of new works. To this end, 21 Buffalo artists have accepted the invitation to participate in an exhibition of new work whose point of departure is the recently completed Gates Vascular Institute in Buffalo's downtown medical corridor, developed by Cannon Design and lead architect Mehrdad Yazdani. Artists working in a diverse array of media have been invited to participate—drawing, painting, photography, filmmaking, and sculpture. Some artists were invited because they've dealt with architecture, form, and landscape before. Some were invited because of the prominence of lines in their work. Some because they've played with forms of modernism and post-modernism. A few were invited as dynamic wild cards.

In contrast to a conventional group exhibition wherein specific works are selected by a curator to illustrate a pre-determined theme, Vascular Modes seeks to explore both the formal and conceptual notions in orbit around this new element on the local landscape while also illustrating the iconoclastic tangents of individual artists—their approach to a question, their use of materials, the trajectory of their process. In his original invitation to artists, Hallwalls' curator John Massier was blunt about his own appreciation of the Gates Vascular Institute as a physical form on the local landscape, a things which draws the eye through its acute but concise deviation on a simple cube, a structure whose lines and edges evoke its purpose.

The resulting works—several still in process at this writing—demonstrate numerous details about artistic process, as some have adopted visual cues from the architecture of the building; others have, through their process, have almost completely obscured the original form; still others have delved deeper into both the symbolism and purpose of the structure; and at least one has manipulated its form into a remark on health care in general.





Exhibition support provided by Leslie and Howard Zemsky and Cannon Design.

 
 
341 DELAWARE AVE.
BUFFALO, NY 14202
t: 716-854-1694
f: 716-854-1696

 
GALLERY HOURS:
Tues.—Fri. 11-6
Sat. 11-2
Sun. & Mon. closed

IN THE GALLERY
from Mar. 14, 2014
through May. 2, 2014
 

Kyle Butler
Mortality Tantrums


Across media including drawing, painting, sculpture, video, and performance, the work of Kyle Butler addresses multiple ideas—parallels between the built environment and human behavior with that sphere; the interplay of competing and cooperating systems and the limitations of those systems; fluidity in the face of bureaucracy; and ordered conduct as a remedy to the ambiguity of socialization.
 

Chantal Rousseau
Harbingers of Doom


Behind the ongoing gif work of Chantal Rousseau resides a drawing and painting practice. Electronically realized, her gifs are clearly hand-rendered, rather than cobbled together from other more technological means. It might seem like a subtle distinction but less so when one considers the work within the broad terrain of other electronically-based aphorisms such as emoticons, memes, and screen savers.